your paddlesports destination

393rl RazorLite™ Kayak

  • 12' 10" Length
  • 28" Width
  • 33.5 Weight (lbs)
  • $ 949 MSRP

393rl RazorLite™ Kayak Description

The World's First All Drop Stitch Patented RazorLite™ inflatable kayak! A lighter, narrower and faster to paddle, high performance solo kayak for the adventurer. With a tapered, hard-nose bow and stern, and fully constructed with Drop Stitch technology, the 393RL cuts through waves cleaner, straighter and sharper than any other kayak on the market allowing paddling speeds up to 6 mph. Because of it's high performance design and capabilities the RazorLite™ Series is best recommended for intermediate and above paddlers.

393rl RazorLite™ Kayak Reviews

(10)

Read and submit reviews for the 393rl RazorLite™ Kayak.

393rl RazorLite™ Kayak Specifications

  • Seating Configuration: Solo
  • Weight: 33.5 lbs
  • Length: 12' 10"
  • Width: 28"
  • Primary Material: Folding/Inflatable

393rl RazorLite™ Kayak Features

  • Structure: Inflatable
  • Cockpit Type: Sit on Top / Open Cockpit
  • Hull Shape: V-Bottom
  • Rudder/Skeg: Skeg/Fin

Additional Attributes

  • NMMA Certified
  • 2 Open and close drain valves
  • Large, Removable, Swept Back Rear Skeg
  • Front & Rear Spray Skirts with Carry Handles
  • 6 D-Rings to Secure Seat and FootRest
  • 3 One-Way Air Valves

Recommended Usage

  • Activity Type: Recreation, Racing/Fitness
  • Water Type: Flat/Sheltered Water, River/Creek (Up to Class II)
  • Duration: Day Trip
  • Skill Level: Intermediate, Advanced
  • Ideal Paddler Size: Average Adult, Larger Adult

Where to Buy the 393rl RazorLite™ Kayak

Learn More

Sea Eagle Inflatables
393rl RazorLite™ Kayak Reviews

Read reviews for the 393rl RazorLite™ Kayak by Sea Eagle Inflatables as submitted by your fellow paddlers. All of the reviews are created and written by paddlers like you, so be sure to submit your own review and be part of the community!

This is one of Sea Eagles...

This is one of Sea Eagles top of the line kayaks. Like the high pressure hard sides and speed. Tracks straight. The newer models come with foot rests already installed which makes paddling easier. The Razor Lites are not for beginners though, their stability is not like other Sea Eagle kayaks because they are slimmer and sides are lower and are made for speed. If you need a more stable kayak, I suggest the Fast Track models.

I love this kayak! I've...

I love this kayak! I've had my Sea Eagle 393rl Razorlite for a couple of years now, and I can honestly say it's the best inflatable kayak I've ever paddled, especially in terms of speed. We have 6 inflatable kayaks, but I was looking for something narrower and faster, speed-wise and also one that had minimal pump-up time. This nice kayak fills the bill! I haven't found a faster inflatable out there. And you cannot beat the portability of it; it fits in my trunk much more compactly than any of the other inflatable kayaks we own. If you're an fairly experienced paddler and are looking for a high quality inflatable kayak to upgrade to, this one is definitely worth the money.

I have been using this...

I have been using this boat for about three months of two or three times a week short trips on lakes and the Platte river.

Speed and convenience are what I like about the design. It takes about five minutes to set up using the hand pump. Inflated to 9-10PSI it is very rigid and fast. Due to the narrow beam it feels a little tippy but there is plenty of paddle clearance. Because of the way the floor meets the sides and the plastic inserts in the bow and stern it is dificult to get completely dry. The material on keel/ bottom is very tough and has held up to semi-submerged sharp metal fencepost scrapes, rocks and pointy sticks without damage. I started with using the skeg but after several trips I now leave it off, the difference in tracking is minor but the improved draft and manuverability are great. This boat is not rated for any kind of whitewater and has no self bailing capability, when the wind waves get more than a foot or so I get some water over the bow when paddling into or quartering the waves. I have regularrly paddled in 10-15 knot winds with only minor effects on tracking. I am 6ft 245lbs and I max out the boats 250lb capacity. I like the boat and would recomend it for intermediate paddlers on smooth waters.

If you want a...

If you want a high-performance inflatable kayak, you probably can't do better than the Razorlite 393; especially for the price. If you've read many reviews, you already know how most 393RL owners feel about this kayak. Instead of echoing all the praise, I'll just say that I recently bought a Razorlite, and I'm about to buy a second one for my companion. Even then I'll have spent less on both than it would cost to get just one hard shell kayak of similar quality and performance.

The best advice I can give anyone is to contact Sea Eagle's "Hawaiian Dan." He's the fellow who does the informative instructional videos. Dan can answer any question you could possibly think of about the 393RL, or any other Sea Eagle product. Then when you're ready, purchase your kayak through Dan. He will walk you through all the details, and make sure you're totally delighted with your new Razorlite 393. Just call Sea Eagle's toll-free number and ask for "Hawaiian Dan" You'll be glad you did.

Fantastic design...

Fantastic design slightly let down by finishing details. Dropstitch is fast to inflate and get on the water, boat handles well and is manoeuvrable. If set up correctly with a flat trim it is quite fast for its length. Nice and light.
Not so good parts in priority of needing improvement:
1. Footrest is woeful. Don't even use it once, a sliding tube on your heel does not all you to achieve an efficient padding stroke. Bin it. Add an extra two d rings and webbing for some foot support. Or even better add a rigid foot platform and use webbing to attach it.
2. Seat is heavy and uncomfortable. Bin it. Get 50mm thick closed cell foam. Dremel the contour of your buttocks into the foam and for not much money you will have a comfortable seat.
3. Bow spray shield is just there to funnel the water into your boat. The end of the bow cover is unsupported so any water on it runs into the boat.
4. It's 10cm too wide and 0.5m too short. It feels very wide and stable.
5. It's a three board canoe, if paddling light it's hydrodynamic form isn't too bad.

The good stuff.
1. Nothing on the market comes close (except the three other clone brands made in the same factory in S Korea that manufacturers Seaeagle), I have tried most brands of folders and nothing goes up faster or is as rigid.
2. After a few modifications it becomes a good boat if the seastate is not too high. Does not like short chop greater than 3ft the bow plunges through the waves and you get a lot of water in the boat. Good boat in large rolling swell, it is very stable and relatively quick if trimmed flat.
3. Good for multi-day paddles once the ergonomics are fixed. On the beach it becomes a comfortable airmattress with the seat and Footrest taken out. With a 'hootchie' tarp over a single fibreglass tent rod positioned front to rear it forms a good weatherproof tent.
4. If extra d rings are glued in it can hold 2x 20L camping drums.
5. It has no rocker so not the best surfing boat but it can be done. Can catch small waves and glide.

I can't wait for the evolved 5 chime version that is 55cm wide and 7m long. Comes with dropstitch deck.There is a market out there, Seaeagle you could dominate this corner of the market with some small improvements.

The 393 RL is a very...

The 393 RL is a very impressive inflatable kayak & I have really grown to appreciate its performance in a short matter of time. Setup is easy and usually takes 5 minutes to inflate with a little hustle. Not seeing a reason to get an electric pump as I doubt it would be any faster.

The carrying bag that is comes with could be a little bigger though, its difficult to repack & the seat doesn't fit inside (my biggest complaint). I use carabiners and attach all gear to the outside of the bag to it easier to transport. Could use a few more D-rings which can be purchased from Sea Eagle at a reasonable price (I picked up two more). The included tall back seat is very comfortable & provides great support. I will sometimes use a towel under the seat to give a little more support though. Towel also comes in handy at the end of the day to wipe everything down.

The included paddle that comes with the kayak is really too long (260 cm) and quite heavy. I bought a Werner Camano paddle (220 cm) which is far superior. Too bad you can't order the 393 RL without the paddle & save a very dollars.

The 393 RL tracks very well, almost too well. I trimmed 3" off the skeg for better clearance in shallow water & it still tracks straight & true. Its easier to turn now as well, another nice improvement.

Speed & glide of the kayak is very similar to a hard shell kayak with its molded bow & stern. The double stitch material allows for an impressive 10 psi making for a very ridged frame. I recently upgraded from another inflatable kayak & its a night & day difference in performance. My average cruising speed has been around 4 mph, which is well over a MPH faster than my previous inflatable. I can hit 5 MPH for short stretches of time but can not sustain that for very long. A 4 mph cruise speed is easy with calm water.

The 393 RL does a great job with wind & isn't tossed around & weathercock like my old inflatable did. The 393 RL is definitely more tippy than my previous inflatable but that should be expected with its narrow 25" width at its waterline. Its still very stable & can take rough water without problem.

I've had many compliments on the lake already and most people are surprised its even an inflatable! One person even asked "how did you get the kayak inside your Mustang?" After seeing people struggle to get their hardshell kayak on the roof of their SUV the 393 RL just keeps putting a smile on my face.

We recently added the...

We recently added the RazorLite 393RL to the fleet and after paddling this in various conditions on a fast river, big lake, and creeks, I give this kayak a 10! One must paddle it to believe it's performance..it moves! Build quality (fit/finish) is top notch with high quality materials used (including the 3 Halkey valves), takes less than 10 minutes to fill, has 2 scupper ports in back (open/close), removable skeg, plenty of D rings for seat and feet adjustments, and at 13'10"" there is plenty of room for gear. Handling? Amazing handling (weighing 28lbs is a big help), with excellent glide, tracking, turning, stability, and ease of paddling. By far this kayak outperforms any inflatable on the market (hard shell rec kayaks too) and I've paddled most. Comes complete with a very good quality pump and decent paddle (good for travel), but buy a good 230/240 length paddle for a better experience. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxfFM790Vbg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nou_LRMz- P4

The Sea Eagle 393 is a new...

The Sea Eagle 393 is a new generation of inflatable kayaks. From the minute it arrives and you unpack, it feels different. I have pumped it up and got it on the water in 7 mins not rushing, but hang on I have missed one of the good bits, it is easily packed (28lbs) to wherever you want to go paddling so the long trek to the shore, the long walk from the carpark, the train, bus or airplane becomes easy.

It is an open kayak so can carry me (heavy) my border collie and a bag of overnight gear easily. The RazorLite is essentially rigid and fast, on the water it tracks very well whether sea or river, waves or current. It is made of tough fabric and when you take it off the water packs up easily and because it doesn't have a fabric cover it doesn't weigh that much more than when you lifted it out of the boot of your car, so is easily backpacked out. I love this and the 473 but shop around for price.

We purchased two 393rl in...

We purchased two 393rl in late June 2015 and have been happy with their performance thus far. This is our first flat water kayak so we can't compare them to a hard shell kayak, we wanted an inflatable for the convenience of using a smaller vehicle to transport them and to store them with limited space. The kayak was fairly stable while getting in, making sure to keep weight centered/balanced. We have taken them out a half dozen times, all of which had low to high winds.

The Razor Lite cuts right through the wind and waves, and in the highest winds we were quite impressed how well they moved. The foot brace is especially helpful in windy conditions. The seats are comfortable, although sometimes needed to pull the bottom front of the seat forward to create a slight incline for comfort, especially when wearing a PFD, we have learned to get the seat "right" before we get in and go. The inside of the kayak has a good deal of leg room, enough to lie down flat if you like (we are under 6' tall).

The D-rings behind the seat can also be used to tie down a small cooler, PFD and maybe a small storage bag. Our opinion on the removable skeg (when on) is that it's a hindrance, especially in a cross wind. The skeg seems to make it a treacherous chore to keep the kayak going straight and makes it harder to turn. We have decided to keep it off permanently. The stern and bow are so ridged that it tracks just fine on its own.

Pumping up the boat takes about 7-10 minutes. The pumps are tall and move very smoothly, you can stand up and pump with one hand till you get to about 7 psi, then it's a little work to get it to 10 lbs. The floor is nice and ridged and so is the entire structure of the kayak. The workmanship is of high quality, built to last. The outside stern and bow fabric has worn some, but seems stable, we are careful not to run up onto rocks, gravel, concrete or rough surfaces.

After using the kayaks we noticed there is hidden water under the floor, down the sides (inside) and in the bow and stern. We have decided to hang them in the carport to dry. For us, it is necessary to allow the kayak to dry a few days, before rolling up and storing in the bag. While paddling a little water does get in so we keep a small absorbent cloth in the drain hole area, this doubles as a way to keep the craft wiped out as debris gets in along the way. To experiment we opened the drain holes to see if it would self-drain, but it doesn't, lots of water came in real quick. We do not use the drains at all, flipping the kayak over is easier. There are a few little "cups" in the bow and stern that collect water also, putting a small cloth in there can get most of it out.

The ease of getting the kayak into the bag has taken some practice. We watched the SeaEagle video (how to), it was helpful. Don't see us ever getting the seat in the bag with the kayak. The backpack straps are padded and adjustable, and there is a spot on the outside to hang the pump/seat. We recommend watching any SeaEagle video they offer on performance, use and instruction.

So in conclusion, we love this kayak, IF it lasts us for the next 50 years it will be worth every penny. We have an old SeaEagle Explorer that is 30 yrs old this year, still in pretty good shape! Thanks SeaEagle

I bought a RazorLite 393rl...

I bought a RazorLite 393rl at the end of 2014. Wasn't expecting to be able to take it out before March, but we're having a surprisingly mild February in the Rockies. I've taken the boat out twice: once for a couple of hours, the second time for four hours. I am 57 years old, 5'10", 185 lbs. I also own a Sea Eagle FastTrack 365 (original model), a Pathfinder IK, and a Native Watercraft Inuit 14.5 rotomolded kayak. Here are some initial impressions of the RazorLite.

Build quality is as good as you'd expect for an IK costing over $1,000. It's well made.
The manual pump is impressive. Inflating all three chambers to 10 psi takes me only about 5 mins.--around 75 strokes per chamber. At 28 lbs., the boat is easy to carry.

When I got in for the first time, I was surprised at how tippy it felt. This is not your typical IK barge with round pontoon hulls, and I would be hesitant to lend it to a beginner. Under way, with my weight centered, the RazorLite feels quite stable. It has a flat bottom, but the bottom just isn't very wide, and it tapers towards bow and stern. If I shift my weight to one side past a certain point, the boat will lean suddenly and get my attention very quickly. I haven't yet tested the limits of its secondary stability to see how readily it will roll over.

I prefer to paddle with my knees raised. The seat is OK at first, but after about an hour it feels hard. I had to grasp the gunwales and lift my butt off the seat to restore circulation. In view of the tippiness, I'm reluctant to raise my center of gravity with much extra padding.

Sea Eagle provides a strap and a PVC pipe as a footrest, but I found it supports only my heels. I built myself a small wooden footrest to replace the pipe.

Sea Eagle promotes the boat as fast, capable of 5 mph. Paddling fairly hard but not all-out, I saw about 4 mph on my GPS. I was more comfortable cruising at around 3.5 mph. However, breeze and current made it hard to gauge speed through the water accurately, and I'm not yet sure how much faster the RazorLite is than my FastTrack.

One thing I'm sure about: tracking is outstanding, with very little yaw. The sharp bow and stern, together with the rear skeg, keep the boat gliding straight. It tracks much better than my other IKs or my Inuit hardshell, yet it's at least as maneuverable as they are. It turns easily with paddle strokes. I don't yet know whether it will hold an edge or allow leaned turns - which would be remarkable in an IK - or whether it will just capsize. (Hey, I'm on the water in February, in the Rockies, without a drysuit!)

The drop-stitch sidewalls of the hull are relatively narrow, and the boat collects more water off paddle blades than my FastTrack does. Also, this is not an easy boat to dry after a trip. On the FastTrack, the drop-stitch floor pulls out when deflated, and you can get a sponge or towel to all the crevices. On the RazorLite, each side of the drop-stitch floor is tape-welded permanently to the hull's side walls. I'm sure the designers had good reason to do that, but it means you can't get underneath the floor chamber with a towel. The two drain holes just forward of the skeg are specifically for clean-out, not for self-bailing, so they need to remain closed when on the water. They help when draining the boat after a trip, but water collects in the stern, under the dark blue aft deck.

The RazorLite has a hard-plastic bow and stern, inside of which is a grid of plastic dividers. They provide rigidity, but they create a series of deep pockets that retain water (and would collect sand and mud, too, I imagine). It's a little awkward to reach in there and clean them out. Flipping the boat drains much of the water but not all. I've used a sponge and towel. A ShopVac might help, too.

Pros:
well-built; tracks amazingly well; maneuvers well; feels pretty fast; feels stable unless leaned; inflates quickly; weighs only 28 lbs.

Cons:
tippy when leaned; difficult to clean and dry the inside; uncomfortable seat after an hour.