NRS Oso PFD

by  NRS

NRS Oso PFD Description

The NRS Oso PFD is a basic, medium profile life jacket for recreational kayakers and rafters with a ventilated, thin-back design for comfort with any type of seat.

NRS Oso PFD Reviews

(5)

Read and submit reviews for the NRS Oso PFD.

NRS Oso PFD Specs and Features

  • Material Description: 400-denier ripstop nylon

Additional Attributes

  • The Oso is a Type III, medium profile PFD delivering 16.5 lbs. of flotation
  • The thin back construction distributes the PlushFit™ foam flotation more broadly to reduce bulk and improve the fit
  • Five-panel design conforms effortlessly to your body's shape, following your movements as you paddle, row, fish or swim
  • Features two large zippered pockets for on-the-water essentials, 3M® reflective accents, shoulder strap keepers and a hidden lash tab
  • Convenient front, zippered entry and six adjustment points for a customized fit
  • The Oso carries the US Coast Guard Certification through Underwriters Laboratories (UL)

Where to Buy the NRS Oso PFD

NRS
NRS Oso PFD Reviews

Read reviews for the NRS Oso PFD by NRS as submitted by your fellow paddlers. All of the reviews are created and written by paddlers like you, so be sure to submit your own review and be part of the community!

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3

I confess: I've not used the…

Submitted by: guest-paddler on 1/13/2022

I confess: I've not used the PFD yet. It was necessary to buy online so I couldn't touch feel and try it on prior to purchase. I agree with other reviews that it is extra thick in front so leaning on a backrest or tree should be comfy. I'm a canoeist so it's not really a concern so long as the bulk doesn't interfere with paddling. BUT here's the thing: I bought a size S/M that it is actually labeled XSM. That's 3 body sizes this thing is supposed to accommodate. AND it is also labeled user weight >88 - 132 lbs. I weigh 165. So is this jacket going to be okay for me? I have apparently adjusted it to fit but won't know how it performs until I get to paddle this spring. Luckily REI has a generous return policy.

4

The thin back design is very…

Submitted by: lucas9p9 on 7/29/2020
The thin back design is very comfortable with the kayak-style seats in my canoe - I can lean back and not feel like there is something in the way. There is enough added bulk in the front that it is noticeable, but it's not an issue. It's comfortable in extreme heat thanks to good ventilation. It has almost no extra features -- the pockets on the front don't hold much -- but gets the job done and is comfortable. If you need more storage maybe opt for the fishing version of this vest, but I think the simplicity and minimal bulk of the Oso make it a better choice for simple day trips where you don't need to have quick access to lots of stuff.
4

The thin back design is quite…

Submitted by: lucas9p9 on 5/6/2020
The thin back design is quite comfortable, especially with the tall seat back in my canoe. Fairly easy for me to get a good fit with the available straps, but the design is on the basic side so you might probably want to try it on first if you have had trouble adjusting other pfds. Pockets on the front are a little smaller than I might like, but I still prefer the simplicity of this one to the increased storage of the fishing-specific version that NRS makes of this pfd. Overall I'm very happy with the Oso -- I'll wear it, feel comfortable, and it will do all I need it to do for the majority of my paddling (day trips on calm lakes and rivers).
4

At the outset I should make…

Submitted by: cliffjacobson on 5/3/2020
At the outset I should make it clear that I am not crazy about any of the new whitewater -capable PFD’s. I find them, heavy, bulky and not well ventilated. Some have side or angled zippers that make them awkward to put on and take off—a hassle if you do much portaging. Oh, how I yearn for the cool, trim vests of the past. If you’re old enough to have owned a Flotherchoc, Harishok, Seda or Extrasport PFD, you know what I’m crowing about. The extraordinary comfort of these defunct PFD’s was due to their “vertical tube” construction. Picture a series of vertical nylon tubes filled with thin, closed-cell foam (the Flotherchoc had air-filled tubes). The tubes expand, contract and bend to follow the contours of your body. And the fabric space between them encourages the exchange of air all around, which makes them cool in summer. Feels like you’re wearing a thin down vest rather than a bulky PFD. Vertical tubes are long gone—they’ve been replaced with foam panels that defy the curves of your body and the flow of air. I’m always on the prowl for a better PFD, so naturally, I perked up when I discovered NSR’s new OSO PFD which is said to be “cool and comfortable” (Is OSO an anachronism for “Oh So Comfortable?). Here’s the skinny from NSR’s web-site.  The thin back construction distributes the PlushFit™ foam flotation more broadly to reduce bulk and improve the fit.  Five-panel design conforms effortlessly to your body's shape, following your movements as you paddle, row, fish or swim.  Features two large zippered pockets for on-the-water essentials, 3M® reflective accents, shoulder strap keepers and a hidden lash tab.  Convenient front, zippered entry and six adjustment points for a customized fit. The OSO is well-ventilated in the sides and back (not in the chest), so it shouldn’t be impossibly hot in the heat of July. The arm holes are large and allow unrestricted movement with either a double or single paddle—no chafing under the arm-pits even when performing strong braces. In-water ride-up is minimal when the straps are adjusted right (tight!). Like most panel-style PFD’s, the OSO is thicker in front (2.5 inches!) than in back (0.5 inches). The “thick chest” is noticeably bulky but it doesn’t adversely affect paddling. The side pockets are flat and unobtrusive. Zippers open on the “down” stroke: they would be more secure if they opened on the “up” stroke. So, is the OSO as airy and comfortable as those long-gone tubular vests? Not even close! But it is one of the few panel types that can be worn all day without complaint. It looks good and it’s priced right. No, it’s not the best choice for big bad rapids, but NRS nailed it right for the kind of canoeing (flat-water through Class II+) that most people do. Sizing runs a bit large; order by chest size, not body weight. My choice for rapids is a well-used Kokotat “MsFit”. It’s designed for women, but its vertically cut front panels make it comfortable for men too. NRS also has a dedicated PFD for women. It’s called the “Nora”. I haven’t tried it but I’ll guess it’s even more comfortable than the OSO. Try a ladies vest, guys--you might be pleasantly surprised!
5

My previous PFD was overkill…

Submitted by: paddler577232 on 2/7/2020

My previous PFD was overkill for the day paddling/overnight touring which I did with my sea kayak. The bulk was reassuring, but that bulk detracted from the comfort of paddling and from optimum flexibility when practicing various kayaking skills.

With the OSO, I can wear my PFD continuously with no fuss and practice rolls, towing, and rescues with ease.

In addition, the reduced bulk makes stowage easy when the PFD is not being worn.

A fine product for its intended usage.