Tripper-S

16' 6"
Length
32"
Width (in)
42–67
Weight (lb)
MSRP

Tripper-S Options

  • Fiberglass Composite

    67 lb
    Fiberglass Composite
  • Kevlar/aramid Composite

    57 lb
    Kevlar/aramid Composite
  • Ultralight Kevlar Composite

    51 lb
    Kevlar/aramid Composite
  • Custom Kevlar Composite

    42 lb
    Kevlar/aramid Composite

    Tripper-S Description

    The Tripper-S is a canoe brought to you by Clipper Canoes. Read Tripper-S reviews or submit your own review to share with the paddling community. Check out a few other canoe recommendations below or explore all canoes to find the perfect one for you!

    Tripper-S Reviews

    (6)

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    Tripper-S Specs and Features

    • Structure: Rigid / Hard Shell
    • Seating Configuration: Solo, Tandem
    • Ideal Paddler Size: Smaller Adult/Child, Average Adult, Larger Adult
    • Skill Level: Intermediate, Advanced
    • Ideal Paddler Size: Smaller Adult/Child, Average Adult, Larger Adult
    • Skill Level: Intermediate, Advanced

    Clipper Canoes
    Tripper-S Reviews

    Read reviews for the Tripper-S by Clipper Canoes as submitted by your fellow paddlers. All of the reviews are created and written by paddlers like you, so be sure to submit your own review and be part of the community!

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    5

    I ordered a fiberglass…

    Submitted by: Chuchi on 2/1/2022

    I ordered a fiberglass Tripper S early 2021, it being the Hight of the pandemic shortage the lead time was around 4-5 months. I was hoping for a good tandem canoe usable for both day tripping but also something like the Barwon lakes. I Idea of being able to paddle around protected waters solo was also appealing but I thought it would be a bit big for me (5'9" 150lbs) to handle in anything but short trips in ideal conditions. I ordered fiberglass with a gelcoat due to my only storage option being outside. I optimistically ordered the upgraded yoke in the hopes It would be light enough to portage (much of my paddling has been in old fiberglass pigs, the only boat with a yoke I had tried to carry was my 14' clipper prospector which is not exactly difficult)

    The boat was built a few weeks earlier than expected, they do not have enough space to have all there molds out at once, I think what happened is there was another 'S that was due for delivery (turns out it was an acquaintance of mine) and mine got made while the mold was out. Visually the gel coat was clear and smooth, but one of the end caps is poorly fitted and collects rain and junk when flipped upside down. the interior is clippers standard for fiberglass, it is kind of beige?/gray? with some dribbles of pigment for visual interest. The inside of the hull looks rough, the glass cloth is asymmetrically uneven and clearly visible, you can see raged ends of the cloth, it doesn't actually affect the feel inside, but someone with a bit of ocd, or someone who really values looks might be put off. The fiberglass layup comes with ribs instead of the vacuum bagged foam floor shown in the websites picture (picture is one of the Kevlar layups). The contoured Yoke I ordered looks great and is well finished.

    As far as my first impressions paddling, with 2 <160lb paddlers it is probably the fastest and best tracking boat I have paddled. Despite its tracking it still has good turning response, and I believe If I had better paddling habit's It would turn well when leaned. Solo it works much so better than I imagined, in anything but a dead calm I use at least 40kg (80ish lbs) of water ballast, milk jugs work fine, but a good dri-bag can be filled with water and used as well. from the kneeling thwart (standard) with good foam padding, you can quite easily accelerate the boat with minimal wasted effort, once up to speed it is relatively easy to maintain momentum, I think a taller and stronger paddler would love it as a solo boat, but even at my size its a great boat. It is a bit unwieldy in tight solo maneuvering, but it has enough rocker to make turning possible.

    Stability wise, solo it is solid at all points, it is narrow and long enough that if you pulled the bow out of the water on a beach and tried to get in it could get hairy, but as long as its sitting properly in the water you will have no issues. Tandem, especially with a novice paddler its not as great. when launching, if your bow paddler attempts to stand up and turn around, you gotta be quick with the brace if you don't want to swim, and I would be uncomfortable taking a larger (200lb+?) uncoordinated paddler with out some assistance launching and beaching. For tandem, canoeing bigger novice paddlers should avoid this boat, two smaller novice paddlers ie. smaller women, will have no issues. I have not taken it out into bad weather (yet its only a matter of time) but I am confident it will preform well, it has relatively low freeboard which is great in the wind, but so far the bow has stayed dry in ocean swells and lighter chop, if I can ever justify it I will get a spray deck and that should be the best of both worlds.

    As far as details and customizations, I with the contoured yoke, I can carry the canoe 500+ meters comfortably, only issue it gets painful before I get tired, more yoke experimentation needed (or maby I will just get a canoe cart like everyone else). I don't regret the fiberglass, but if I had indoor storage space, I probably would have forked out the cash for the Kevlar duriflex, the flush floor, lighter weight and stronger hull would be nice. My acquaintance, a petite woman, bought hers in the ultralight layup and can comfortably carry it alone. the black gunnel kit looks nice, but does highlight the scratches from my roof racks.

    Pros

    fast with 2 people

    comfortable to solo

    tracks well

    lower freeboard in the wind

    decent final stability

    large enough for tripping

    Cons

    novices will find it tender or "tippy"

    a bit smaller than most true tripping canoes

    not as high and stable as something like a prospector (not really a whitewater boat)

    the fiberglass layup's ribs make kneeling tricky (still working out exactly what foam goes were)

    fit and finish is a bit disappointing up close

    RECMENDATION

    Bigger paddler: this will be a great solo boat, and once your are comfortable you can do tandem day paddling.

    Midsize paddler: it will solo well, but might be a tiny bit bigger than perfection, tandem tripping is totally possible, and day tripping with 3 adults or even 2 adults + 2 kids is totally doable. as far as one boat does all this is as close as you will find.

    Small paddler (petite women/bigger kids): solo will be a bit of a handful, but with technique, ballast and in ok weather, should be fine. This will be a perfect size boat for you and a similar sized friend to do serious tripping, 2-4 kids could have a great time paddling on there own.

    Families : If you want to paddle with your spouse, this will do for up to 2 smaller children day tripping but your kids will eventually outgrow it. consider stepping up to a regular tripper

    for family paddling with 2 boats: I think a great paring would be a tripper and a tripper 'S. it would allow all sorts of options the kids grow, as well as the option of leaving the kids and having a peaceful afternoon solo on the water

    Fleet (youth group/camp/rental): Probably not quite the right boat for this. bit expensive, not quite as stable, might want some extra layers of fiberglass before giving to a kid to ram into a rock. [having 1 or 2 for a camp might work]

    Novice paddlers: totally a boat you could grow to enjoy, but initial learning may feel uncomfortable, would NOT recommend if you are a bigger paddler, or have flexibility issues. (gotta stay low when your moving around the boat) consider picking up a used boat for your first season, learn, than decide were to go from there (used boats hold value quite well)

    White water: I do not paddle whitewater so take this with a grain of salt: probably fine in class 1 maybe 2, anything past get something with more free board, rocker and fuller bow. not totally convinced any composite boat will survive a wrap.

    Every boat is a compromise, to get something your going to lose something else but this is as close to a prefect boat I have paddled. I will likely continue to explore other boats and options, but even if I never find anything better I will still be happy.

    owned 1 full year, no actual issues beyond some minor cosmetic gripes and some cosmetic scrapes (like all canoes)

    5

    We bought this canoe 2nd…

    Submitted by: paddler1627302 on 8/2/2021

    We bought this canoe 2nd hand and loved it from the test drive (paddle). I have another solo that I have paddled for years and my partner had never really paddled a canoe much before. We bought to do the Bowron circut, thinking if we didn't like it, we could probably sell it after the trip for a similar price. Well, that is never going to happen. We have since taken it on several trips and it is great when you want the versatility of having a tandem, but ability to paddle solo. Often when we are camped and one of us wants to do a short solo, we are able to take it out with ease. My partner loves it now as well, and has become quiet a proficient paddler in both the bow and stern positions. The canoe tracks well and the Kevlar material allows us to feel almost indestructible. Loading, unloading, moving are all easy due to its light weight. It tracks great, and holds more than all the gear we would ever need. I would recommend this to anyone who might want the versatility of a tandem and solo.

    5

    We bought this canoe 2nd…

    Submitted by: paddler1627306 on 8/2/2021

    We bought this canoe 2nd hand and loved it from the test drive (paddle). I have another solo that I have paddled for years and my partner had never really paddled a canoe much before. We bought to do the Bowron circut, thinking if we didn't like it, we could probably sell it after the trip for a similar price. Well, that is never going to happen. We have since taken it on several trips and it is great when you want the versatility of having a tandem, but ability to paddle solo. Often when we are camped and one of us wants to do a short solo, we are able to take it out with ease. My partner loves it now as well, and has become quiet a proficient paddler in both the bow and stern positions. The canoe tracks well and the Kevlar material allows us to feel almost indestructible. Loading, unloading, moving are all easy due to its light weight. It tracks great, and holds more than all the gear we would ever need. I would recommend this to anyone who might want the versatility of a tandem and solo.

    5

    I am 56 years old and I have…

    Submitted by: tomtankersley on 8/10/2016

    I am 56 years old and I have been an active boater for the past 35 years. And without a doubt my best investment in outdoor equipment has been my Clipper Canoe. She is now 30 plus years old and going strong which says a lot as some may classify me as a "certified" boat abuser. Life is short and worrying about scratches and various damage to your boat just detracts from the outdoor experience. Remember, just about anything can be repaired on a fiberglass boat with minimal skills.

    I have been in many canoes over the years and still prefer the Clipper over all others and here is why.
    * My Clipper is made of what seems to be indestructible fiberglass. The bow and stern has sustained the most damage from beaching but that is easily reinforced with fiberglass from time to time. The boat even sustained a folding of the front 1/3 as an untied bow line on the boat was not tied to the car. The car took off and ran over the line and folded the boat over the car rack. It snapped the gunnel but the fiberglass shell was "fine".
    * The plastic tractor seats may look cheap as compared to the classic cane seats but they are so much more comfortable and durable. Also the seats are set below the gunnel making for better stability.
    * My clipper came with foot braces that make for better stability. With these braces you feel more at one with the boat and are able to brace with more confidence as well as paddle with more power.
    * At 16' my boat seems to have the right combination of width and length to ride up and over most heavy wind whipped waves without spearing through the waves.
    * The weight of the Clipper is reasonable and I have always done the carrying of my boat myself as it just seems easier and I am not a big guy...5'6" tall.
    * Carrying capacity is great. Surely I have over loaded this boat many times and it always performed like a trooper.

    My Clipper has gone on rivers, lakes, surfing the waves in Santa Cruz, and even open water fishing in the Pacific Ocean. Sure, it does not look as pretty as when new but I am confident that my son will some day use this boat, when I am long gone, and tell stories, to his kids, about the adventures he and Grandpa had in the now faded Clipper canoe.

    Again...best outdoor equipment buy I ever made!

    4

    I have owned the Tripper S in…

    Submitted by: paddler236480 on 9/1/2015
    I have owned the Tripper S in Kevlar for three years and paddle about 50d per year – a mixture of lakes and rivers with two circuits of Bowron Lakes (one solo, one tandem). I am a lifelong paddler (late 50s), and I have been in love with canoes before (cedar canvas prospector, Royalex Light prospector).

    The Tripper S is a great canoe for me -- 90% of my paddling is solo. It is light, loads and portages easily. It is fast through the water, tracks well and handles waves. Somewhat slower turning is the compromise for tracking, so better for flat water than whitewater. Kneeling to paddle solo is a fantastically stable – pad your knees.

    In tandem paddling, both paddlers should have experience or at least coordination. The Tripper S is not forgiving of a large, inexperienced and uncoordinated paddler. If all my paddling was tandem, I think I would still want my Tripper S. If all my paddling was tandem tripping, I would go for the Tripper.

    So why 10/10? It seems like this canoe was custom built for me.

    4

    I was at first reluctant to…

    Submitted by: guest-paddler on 8/6/2004
    I was at first reluctant to offer a review because I am a beginning canoeist. But then I saw some reviews of interest giving new canoeist's first impressions. Besides, despite numerous reviews of Western's classic Tripper model, there was no review of the Tripper "S". Just be aware that this is not a comparison because I have virtually nothing to compare my boat to. The Tripper S is one foot shorter and slightly narrower than Western's classic Tripper. It is a combination (compromise?) solo/tandem. Besides two of Western's highly regarded bucket or tractor seats, it has a sloped kneeling thwart for solo paddling. This encourages, requires, the soloist to assume the traditional kneeling posture. Good for stability - I love that about it. Not so good for tired old knees - I've taken up canoeing at the end of my sixth decade. I found it difficult to get canoe information living in the heart of sea kayak country/waters (Vancouver Island, British Columbia). But I persisted and went to the source, Western's home location in Abbotsford, B.C. Having sold a sailboat because I could not raise a crew in my family, I still vacilated over solo vs. tandem canoe. The Tripper S offered the solution allowing me to get experience both ways. Canoeing has been great this first summer! In the first month I was probably on the water more times than I had been in two and half years of sailboat ownership. The Tripper S afforded a trauma-free start for a beginner guided only by several how-to books. It is reasonably stable solo or tandem. There is a feeling of sea-worthiness with reserve or ultimate stability. Stability degraded only slightly when carrying two large men and 60 or 70 lbs. of water bags for trim ballast with the heavier but less experienced paddler in the bow. Some camping gear in the bottom may have improved it. My boat is a clear kevlar ultra light, 48.5 lbs. Solo and unballasted it accelerates gratifyingly with each stroke. And, all important for the solo paddler, I can easily cartop it by myself. I find it maneuvers well enough to respond as I practice a variety of strokes. And yet it tracks well enough even light that solo cruising is not frustrating and cross winds are manageable. The aforementioned water ballast, distributed fore and aft, is a help if cross winds are anticipated. I love my boat and would rate it higher than an 8 except that it is, after all, trying to cover two bases at once. A dedicated solo would doubtless be narrower, easier to paddle, and probably higher performing whether a flat water or white water specialist. But the all-around aspect of the "S", its large competent feel, is a delight and is opening up a wonderful world of outdoor sport and exercise for me. Did I say I love my boat and the beautiful places it takes me?