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Camano Carbon

by Werner Paddles

The Camano features Werner's most popular award winning blade design. Providing the perfect combination for paddlers who want enough power to cover their day's journey with ease, using the relaxed all around low angle stroke. Matched with ample fit and design features, you can outfit yourself for a lifetime of paddling. Available in Straight 1 piece, 2 piece or 4 piece and Bent 1 piece or 2 piece. PRices range from $335-$425 depending on which option you choose.

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Reviews

I am very pleased with this paddle...

Submitted by: on

I am very pleased with this paddle. I have the all carbon model with a bent shaft. There are numerous combinations of material choices between shaft and blades. I will limit this review to the all carbon model as I have not paddled the fiberglass blades or fiberglass shaft models.

The bent shaft vs. straight shaft is a matter of personal preference. Some paddler like one or the other and both sides have good reason. I will not go into the shaft choices other than to say the paddle is available in both bent and straight shaft models.

I have a 230 cm paddle because of the wider boat I owned when the paddle was purchased. The current fleet of boats and my size all fall into the category of 220 cm being a better fit. The paddle is available in lengths from 210 cm to 240 cm for the bent shaft and 205 to 260 cm for the straight shaft.

The all carbon model is very light and has been durable for thousands of miles of paddling. The two piece model has a quick release splined center that allows for easy feather adjustment. The one weakness of this paddle and most other two piece paddles is salt can cake where the paddle fits together, making it hard to separate the two pieces. It is important to rinse the paddle and take it apart immediately after paddling in salt water.

The blades and shaft are stiff and very efficient with proper technique.

This is a low angle paddle that is most efficient with a short stroke that ends before the blade reaches the hip. If the paddle stroke extends too far backward, the blades lift a lot of water when raising the blade out of the water. This causes an energy loss and the later part of the paddle stroke does not efficiently add to forward propulsion.

This is not the lightest carbon paddle on the market, but it is sufficiently light, well balanced and durable. A good choice if you are looking to move up to a high performance low angle touring paddle.

I reviewed this paddle 10 years ago in bent shaft all carbon…

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I reviewed this paddle 10 years ago in bent shaft all carbon configuration. That paddle is still in use and still a very nice paddle. Over the years Werner has made several improvements and offers additional options.

First let me say that the Camano is a low angle, recreational paddle. Let me say that this is exactly what I need in a paddle, but you should first decide your use for the paddle and your paddling style before making a decision about what paddle to buy.

Back to the Camano, whereas my old one offers two positions, feathered or not, the new ones feature multiple angle adjustments for feather. This feature can help some people find a comfortable level of feather and it is exactly repeatable because there is an indexing scale built right into the paddle. The new Camano carbon is a few ounces lighter than the old ones. There are configuration options too. I recently bought a bent shaft carbon Camano with bright yellow fiberglass blades. It is not much heavier than my old all carbon fiber Camano and offers both greater durability for river use, and greater visibility for use in high boating traffic situations.

I keep trying different paddles, but for me, my use, my paddling style, the Camano continues to perform better than any other. Highly recommended.

220cm bent shaft, small diameter, carbon fiber Camano paddle - WOW.…

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220cm bent shaft, small diameter, carbon fiber Camano paddle - WOW. Had several paddles, AT, Werner Kalliste and this one is just absolutely a dream to use! Can paddle super long distances and I can't stop smiling.

I have been using a Werner Camano, carbon, bent shaft for almost…

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I have been using a Werner Camano, carbon, bent shaft for almost 2 years. Periodically I swap with friends to try other paddles and this always leads to discussion. The following comments and observations are respectfully offered:

1. If you are just getting started a bent shaft paddle is the way to go.
2. Bent shaft is difficult to adjust to for those who started with a straight shaft.
3. Straight shaft is easier to adjust to for those used to bent shaft so it is feasible to use a bent shaft as a primary, with a less costly straight shaft for backup.
4. For those used to bent shaft there are never any times when it is not an advantage over a straight shaft.
5. Hand placement is perfect on the bent shaft Camano and it is very easy to control this paddle even in difficult surf or high wind conditions.
6. The Camano is more rugged than the similar Kaliste, both have slight flutter in some situations, easily controlled and not a problem.
7. The light weight of the carbon really starts to matter on long days on the water, but is probably not as critical for young, strong paddlers, or those who only go out for short, leisurely excursions.
8. People who are used to aluminum or fiberglass paddles find carbon very nice. People who prefer wood paddles find carbon unpleasant.
9. The people at Werner are great, their customer service is faultless, and their products are well made and generally trouble-free.
10. I think any high grade paddle from a reputable company would prove satisfying for a paddler who has no prior experience. For experienced paddlers the issue of which paddle is the best one for them becomes more difficult. So for anyone reading these comments who is just starting out recognize that your first paddle is critical. For a wide variety of uses and users the Werner Camano, bent shaft is a very good place to start.
11. In my opinion we spend too much time worrying about which boat to buy. In reality our paddle choice is much more important.

I recently was talked into spending the extra money for the…

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I recently was talked into spending the extra money for the Carbon fiber Camano. I paddled the fiberglass for years in rental sea kayaks and loved it. When I purchased my own sea kayak the dealer convnced me to spring for the carbon model: that is the best money I ever spent. Paddling for ten to twenty miles a day, the few saved ounces add up by multiplying the number of strokes times the weight. During parts of the trip the other kayaker on the trip asked to try my paddle, what a mistake that was. Towards the end he whined so much that I had to let him use my carbon blade, he did buy the beer as a rental fee. Upon returning to shore he said he would go back to our dealer and see if they would let him trade up to a carbon. A 10 in my book,no flutter and a joy to use. One trick to ease the assembly and disassembly try using some of the oil from your nose on the ferules.