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Name: davidmichael

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For seven years, we used special home made steel bar racks built on top of our Class C RV for manual lifting and lowering of two kayaks and a canoe. By climbing up on the rear ladder to the roof I just lifted the kayaks or canoe by line (rope) using a small carpet to guard against any damage to the motorhome. We fulltimed for seven magical years and loved it. Now in our eighties, however, we sold the RV and purchased a new Promaster Cargo Van. A smaller van is so much easier to drive than an RV so that we should be able to continue traveling into our nineties.

We had Rack Attack in Portland, OR attach a kayak rack on top of the van with hullavators for our two 12 foot kayaks. We have tested them thoroughly over the past year with a three month trip across the northern USA on Highway 80, Highway 90, and the TransCanadian to Vermont and Minnesota from Oregon and return. Highway 80 is basically used as a cross-country truck route wth endless 30 mph wind gusts. It's gotta be the worst way to cross the USA. The good news is that Wyoming could power the entire Northwest with wind power. Yet, the hullavators held the van and kayaks as I thought surely the kayaks would fly off the roof.

In summary, I can't say enough good things about this product and the good people at Rack Attack. It did cost us $1200 for everything, and it was worth every dollar. We head out in a few weeks for three months in Baja California camping along the beach as we go. The hullavators are a great Thule product.

For seven years, we used special home made steel bar racks built on top of our Class C RV for manual lifting and lowering of two kayaks and a canoe. By climbing up on the rear ladder to the roof I just lifted the kayaks or canoe by line (rope) using a small carpet to guard against any damage to the motorhome. We fulltimed for seven magical years and loved it. Now in our eighties, however, we sold the RV and purchased a new Promaster Cargo Van. A smaller van is so much easier to drive than an RV so that we should be able to continue traveling into our nineties.

We had Rack Attack in Portland, OR attach a kayak rack on top of the van with hullavators for our two 12 foot kayaks. We have tested them thoroughly over the past year with a three month trip across the northern USA on Highway 80, Highway 90, and the TransCanadian to Vermont and Minnesota from Oregon and return. Highway 80 is basically used as a cross-country truck route wth endless 30 mph wind gusts. It's gotta be the worst way to cross the USA. The good news is that Wyoming could power the entire Northwest with wind power. Yet, the hullavators held the van and kayaks as I thought surely the kayaks would fly off the roof.

In summary, I can't say enough good things about this product and the good people at Rack Attack. It did cost us $1200 for everything, and it was worth every dollar. We head out in a few weeks for three months in Baja California camping along the beach as we go. The hullavators are a great Thule product.

I just tried the Rio kayak from Eddyline this week. Wow! This is a beauty and fast. Very fast, light and maneuverable from a company known for their high quality kayak construction and innovative building techniques using a Carbonlite 2000 Thermoform Composite.

Here's what I especially like about the RIO. it weighs 35 pounds. Yep! Only three pounds above our Sky 10 kayaks that we currently own. That's a nearly 12 foot boat vs. a 10 footer (SKY). It's a bit narrow and built for smaller and lighter kayakers such as my wife who is 5'4" and weighs 125 pounds. It moves with incredible ease and speed. So, for us, a no-brainer. We are selling a SKY 10 and buying the Rio for my wife. It's a bit pricey, but I was able to buy it on the Fall sale at our local kayak shop. We are approaching our 80's now, so weight is a factor. Yet, we didn't want to lose out on performance. So, the RIO fits the bill for lakes, rivers and small bays. Plus, it's small and light enough to fit in our apartment in the off season.

We plan to spend the winter on Conception Bay in the Sea of Cortez (Baja California). So along with a RAM Promaster Van that we are converting into a camper, we should be all set for the next five years of kayaking. My own preferred kayak is a 13 foot Necky Manitou which weighs around 45 pounds. I am keeping my Sky 10 for local trips because it's very light and will fit inside our new van.

This is my second review of the Sky 10 now that I have used it for several months. Overall, it is a great boat for our purposes since we moved into an apartment in Eugene with no garage. I love the low weight of 32 pounds. Awesome. Great to use on small lakes, ponds, and streams. Added a Ram Mount with suction cup for fishing. Works great!

Not so good in any heavy waters with large waves. Rather than cutting through them, the kayak rides on top and becomes less stable and a bit tipsy. I've yet to try it on Class 2 rapids in a river environment but would be a bit concerned in rough water. And, with such a short length, it just doesn't have the glide necessary for large bodies of water.

We have owned a Necky Manatu 14 for the past eight years while RVing around the country. Fabulous kayak and my all around choice for most bodies of water. But...the Sky 10 is just lots of fun in the smaller lakes and streams.

They clean up easily with soap and water. For us (age 78) they work because we store them in our apartment. We are now converting a cargo van into a camper to hold the kayaks inside to make for fast getaways. Not having a garage provides storage challenges with any kayak. Leaving them on top of the car or van for storage invites theft, unfortunately.

So, in summary, a great kayak for the urban dweller near small streams, ponds, and lakes.

Just went up to the Bend,OR Paddlefest at Tumalo Creek Kayak. Great time trying out lots of kayaks. Have owned five previous yaks (Necky) over the past 20 years and three canoes (Old Town). We kayak in all sorts of water including lakes, rivers, ocean bays and creeks.

We have had two Necky Manatu Kayaks (14.4 ft) on our RV while exploring the USA and Canada full time for the past seven years. But...nearing age 80, we decided to settle down for part of the year with renting an apartment in our home town of Eugene. Life is all together different now. Decided to sell our RV and larger kayaks to select smaller ones to fit inside a converted cargo camping van or the apt. Thought we would get the Pyranha Fusion 30 or Jackson Rogue as a crossover boat for rivers and lakes. But...so, so unstable! Too much work and definitely wouldn't use them for relaxing outings, photography or fishing. In all, tried about ten kayaks before my wife pointed out the Eddyline Sky 10 for her. With a great seat and cockpit area, I found it easy to get in and out. Going across the river, against the current, it was incredibly stable yet faster than all of the boats I tried (Perception, Necky, etc). Couldn't believe it! So easy and comfortable. At 32 pounds it's perfect for car topping.

To make a long story short, we bought two and now have them inside the apt until our van is finished. I'll be trying them on our local Willamette and McKenzie Rivers soon and will report how they handle in Class One and Two rapids, small streams and creeks. In my opinion, these are great, great kayaks suitable for beginner or advanced paddler. And, they are very stable and classy looking.

I just tried out three of the Hobie kayaks... Outback, Rev 11, and 13. Here are my observations: The Outback is slow, sluggush, heavy, and a great fishing platform. Kind of like trying to paddle or peddle a tank in water. If someone doesn't mind lots of resistance, this is a great boat for the angler since it has lots of deck room for fishing stuff, and stability for open water.

My personal favorite, however, was easily the Rev 11. Maybe because I have other kayaks for paddling and exploring. However, I really want a kayak for fishing. Thus, the need for the peddles and Mirage system. This kayak turns on a dime yet is very stable, great for peddling as well as paddling. And, especially for car topping. At 57 pounds, it was 20 pounds lighter than the Outback. Thus, a no brainer for my Thule Rack on top of our CRV Honda.

I didn't feel the Rev 13 added that much difference. Longer by a few inches but felt the Rev 11 had everything I needed. I plan to buy the Hobie Rev 11 this summer and replace my Old Town Pack canoe. The Mirage peddle system sold me on the advantages for a great fishing system.

I've had my Pack Angler for five years now. We haul it around on our 27 foot Class C motorhome during much of the year and then place it on our Honda CRV for the summer. It's a good, all-around, solid boat with the use of a single kayak paddle. We also have two 14.4 foot Necky Kayaks we use for rivers and lakes and Bays, but for fishing I prefer the Pack.

I recently purchased foot and thigh braces to make it more comfortable on longer day trips for fly fishing. It would be great if Old Town top added these braces as that's about the only thing it lacks. At age 76, I haul it around like I was 30 years old. One of these days we'll trade our kayaks in for a Kevlar Canoe but my wife loves that kayak. Went down the Green River to the Colorado last year and camped out 10 days on our own. It was a kick. Loving the West and the freedom of the Rving lifestyle!

My wife (age 72) and I (age 75) just finished a 10-day kayak camping trip on the Green River from the State Park to the confluence with the Colorado in Utah (about 120 miles). Wowzee! What a great trip.

My wife has a brand new Manitou 14 and mine is more than two years old. (Her Old Town Cayuga 13 was stolen during the past summer. Bummer!) We had few problems with either kayak. Necky has made a major design improvement on the hatch covers. They used (mine) to be a pain in stretching the neoprene inner cover to secure the hatch. Now...it's easy (hers). Nice going Necky! However, prepare for a little leaking in the rear hatch of either model. So...just make sure to use dry bags. The skeg plays a role in this. I personally love the skeg, as does my wife, who chose the Necky because it does have a skeg and keeps the Manitou on track in high winds. But...it takes up hatch space. And...when I recovered my kayak at the end of the trip from the shuttle operator , guess what? The skeg was gone! Yikes! Somehow through dragging on the sand or getting caught on rocks in some the of the lower water rapids (class one) it must have broken off. So, I'll call Necky next week and find out what can be done.

Otherwise, I love this kayak as it's a good all around kayak. Now that we have used it for small and large rivers, streams, and lakes, we will take it to B.C. next year and kayak the ocean bays. Also...we carried 10 days of food and camping stuff, took along a MSR water filter for drinking water. This kayak carries an amazing amount of camping equipment including a small tent. A bit like backpacking on the water. Two hatches are very, very important if thinking of camping with a kayak.

I give the Necky Manitou 14 a thumbs-up and recommend it strongly. (Personally I was disappointed to learn they moved their operation from the Northwest to Old Town, Maine.) It seems that when a larger company buys out a smaller one such as Necky or Old Town by Johnson Outdoor Products, there is a lot of enthusiasm lost in the process. Old Town factory in Old Town, Maine, is a shell of what it once was and their spirits (IMHO) have dropped significantly. My motto...keep it small and personal! But it's better than building kayaks in China. So a strong salute to Necky and Old Town!!!